Part of
Sensory Processing Handbook

The eight senses - guidance for practitioners in Somerset

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Part of
Sensory Processing Handbook

The eight senses - guidance for practitioners in Somerset

1

Introduction

information on the nature of sensory processing differences and the impact they can have on children and young people's lives

Somerset SEND CharterWhat is sensory processing?Sensory processing differences or difficultiesInteroception – the eighth senseChecklists and assessments
2

The sensory system

Safe interventions for both children and young people, and groups

TactileProprioceptiveInteroceptiveVestibularVisualAuditoryOlfactoryTaste
3

School approaches

Recommendations for creating appropriate learning environments for pupils with sensory processing differences

Whole school approachClassroom strategiesWhat to do if you are concerned a pupil is experiencing sensory processing difficultiesReferring to occupational therapy

What it is

We receive visual input through our eyes and use this information in conjunction with our brains to interpret our physical environment.  Our visual system is highly complex, there are many different aspects of our visual perception skills including visual discrimination, visual memory, visual form and visual motor ability.

Hypersensitve

(over-sensitive)

Potential signsPotential impactStrategies to assist with learning
Avoiding areas with bright lights or a lot of visual informationDifficulty concentrating in busy and cluttered environments.Minimising visual input in the learning environment. Creating an area of the classroom with blank walls or a screen.
Difficulty finding information on busy backgrounds, such as a lot of text on a sheet or information on the whiteboard.Difficulties copying information off whiteboards in class.Using coloured overlays for written information.
Difficulty completing puzzle, copying shapes and learning how to write letters/numbers.Using a clear desk policy in class.
Difficulty finding things in a cluttered environment,Labelling drawers and cupboards.
Difficulty deciphering graphs and chartsConsider dull coloured lighting.

Hyposensitive

Hyposensitive

Potential signsPotential impactStrategies to assist with learning
Flicking objects in front of eyesSimilar impacts to over-sensitive visual systemsAs above plus:
Fascination with moving objects or flashing lightsDistracted by wanting to flick objects or look at lights.Sensory toys that provide visual input when required
Difficulty finding information on busy backgrounds such as a lot of text on a sheet or information on the whiteboard.Bright colours highlighting key facts/areas to help focus attention

Last reviewed: April 26, 2023 by Jenny

Next review due: October 26, 2023

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